Browsing All Posts filed under »Cyber Policy«

A New Hope…

December 24, 2013 by

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Dave Aitel has graciously allowed us to run his commentaries before – see Hackers May Help Choose The Next US President and Aitel On Cyberwar. Dave is the founder and Chief [Security|technology|executive][1] Officer of Immunity, Inc, and runs the Daily Dave mailing list, where this article was originally published. It is re-published here with his kind permission. So […]

Banning Feds From DefCon Is Self Defeating. Here’s Why.

July 11, 2013 by

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If you’re not familiar with DefCon, the hacker confab that has been meeting in Vegas for more than 20 years, you’re not paying attention to hacking. DefCon (and the accompanying conferences like BlackHat and BSides) makes Vegas the nerdiest place in the universe during July. You don’t want to use an ATM, connect to a […]

Big Ears, Little Ears: One article, three layers of blown secrecy, and how Edward Snowden proves my point

June 18, 2013 by

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Today’s guest post is from Eric Olson, author of the Digital Water blog and a previous contributor to PLI. Well, I haven’t had much time to write here for quite a while, but the Edward Snowden affair – and more specifically this piece in the Guardian – were such a terrific display of the Digital […]

Strikeback! Commission on IP Theft Report Gets All Ronin On China

May 23, 2013 by

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A bipartisan group that studies the effects and impacts of IP theft in the US, The Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, has released a report outlining their findings on the scope of the issue and making policy recommendations to combat it. The most interesting proposal among several: strikeback to re-capture stolen IP […]

CBKB Nominated for Innovating Justice Award

September 24, 2012 by

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This morning I saw that the folks over at the Cost-Benefit Knowledge Bank for Criminal Justice (CBKB) have been nominated for an Innovating Justice Award. Before I talk about the IJA, let me just mention that the work done by the CBKB is absolutely essential to law enforcement agencies across the United States (they’ve also […]

Federal Court: Location Tracking via Cell-Phone Pinging is Kosher

August 15, 2012 by

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The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit has ruled that police may track the signals eminating from wireless devices, such as cell phones, owned by a person. In United States v Skinner, the court found that a drug dealer whose position was being tracked by the DEA as he and his son […]

Cybercrime Statistics: What Are The Chinese Counting?

July 30, 2012 by

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Over the weekend I read a piece in the US version of China Daily on some of the cyber crime issues being faced by China. The article reveals some interesting statistics about what China considers to be cyber crime. Apparently, in addition to traditional cyber criminal targets such as account details and personal information, the Chinese […]