Browsing All Posts filed under »Education«

A New Hope…

December 24, 2013 by

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Dave Aitel has graciously allowed us to run his commentaries before – see Hackers May Help Choose The Next US President and Aitel On Cyberwar. Dave is the founder and Chief [Security|technology|executive][1] Officer of Immunity, Inc, and runs the Daily Dave mailing list, where this article was originally published. It is re-published here with his kind permission. So […]

Opportunity is Knocking. Answer the Door.

October 31, 2013 by

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If you’ve ever thought that you should open the door when opportunity comes knocking? Listen up: it’s pounding on your door. It’s not often that we in the public safety community are approached with an opportunity to hothouse innovation, but this is one of those times. This week the call went out specifically to those […]

Civic Coding and You – Apply for the Code for America Fellowship

July 29, 2013 by

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Dave and I have sat in a room – this was recently – watching a college-educated woman at a desk with two computers, and two keyboards. She was typing information from one into the other because the two systems didn’t talk to one another. The data she was moving had to do with dangerous fugitives. […]

Banning Feds From DefCon Is Self Defeating. Here’s Why.

July 11, 2013 by

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If you’re not familiar with DefCon, the hacker confab that has been meeting in Vegas for more than 20 years, you’re not paying attention to hacking. DefCon (and the accompanying conferences like BlackHat and BSides) makes Vegas the nerdiest place in the universe during July. You don’t want to use an ATM, connect to a […]

Big Ears, Little Ears: One article, three layers of blown secrecy, and how Edward Snowden proves my point

June 18, 2013 by

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Today’s guest post is from Eric Olson, author of the Digital Water blog and a previous contributor to PLI. Well, I haven’t had much time to write here for quite a while, but the Edward Snowden affair – and more specifically this piece in the Guardian – were such a terrific display of the Digital […]

To Whom the 4th Amendment Doesn’t Apply

June 9, 2013 by

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Guest blogger Chris Swan contributed this from the UK. Chris is Chief Technology Officer of CohesiveFT, where he focuses on product development and product delivery. After a decade as a Combat Systems Officer in the Royal Navy, Chris moved to the financial services industry where over the last 12 years he was an engineer, architect, […]

Strikeback! Commission on IP Theft Report Gets All Ronin On China

May 23, 2013 by

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A bipartisan group that studies the effects and impacts of IP theft in the US, The Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, has released a report outlining their findings on the scope of the issue and making policy recommendations to combat it. The most interesting proposal among several: strikeback to re-capture stolen IP […]

Weapons-Grade Stupid

May 7, 2013 by

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Just a collection of stories from the last month or so related to zero-tolerance and weaponry in schools. We have enough problems with real guns to allow this to be taken so seriously. So, presented for your dining and dancing pleasure, ladies and gentlemen, with limited comment. He’s Got A Gun  … Where? I … […]

How We Learn What We Know, to Chart What We Know

April 29, 2013 by

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I spent an enjoyable 20 minutes today speaking with Hilary Sargent, an OSINT rock-star who had to ask me what OSINT was. That’s not to say that she didn’t know – I’m sure she did. But when I told her that it was Open Source INTelligence, and further explained the difference, say, between that and […]

Boston Bombing Investigation: Intel Failure? No. Bad Expectation-Setting? Oh, yeah.

April 24, 2013 by

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This is a long post. As either Blaise Pascal, Mark Twain, Voltaire or my Uncle Sid said, I didn’t have time to make a shorter post. It ran today in CSO Magazine and will run in other outlets this week (though this version here has some footnotes). In a hurry? Here’s a summary: My conclusion is […]

The Answer Is In Your Data. And It’s “No” Until You Ask.

November 15, 2012 by

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This post covers some really basic stuff, but it’s fundamental to what we do, so I think it’s worth a review. You’ve probably heard of “big data”, which after “cloud” is the most over-used, God-awful buzz-phrase of the past couple of years. Basically, big data means aggregating and correlating very large sets of data and […]

The City That Became … [How Much] Safer?

November 12, 2012 by

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I just picked up a copy of the most racy book available to crime analysts this month, The Crime Numbers Game: Management by Manipulation (Advances in Police Theory and Practice) by John A. Eterno and Eli B. Silverman. Eterno was a NYPD officer who rose through the ranks and retired a captain; he and Silverman, […]

Guest Post – Dr Jez Phillips: What is Offender profiling?

November 9, 2012 by

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Today’s guest post is from the blog of Dr Jez Phillips, a psychologist, Deputy Head of Psychology and senior lecturer at the University of Chester in the UK. Phillips has a particular interest in the field of forensic psychology. This is a broad area in itself, covering the application of psychology to diverse but related […]

Creating A Law Enforcement Farm Team: A Rozzer Back-Bench

November 5, 2012 by

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In law enforcement, there are two factions: sworn or non-sworn, and for many things (with the notable exception of crime and intelligence analysis) never the twain shall meet. This is as much about cops as it is about human nature, and I’m not trying to change it. But I’ve noticed that, in things like arrest […]

II: Reports You Need To Read Now

October 24, 2012 by

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Three reports you should be aware of – and not just because Dave and I are so busy with warrant work that we’ve had no time to do anything except point to the analysis of others – are covered in this report, and all are worth reading. The first big report, which we were in […]